A skin expert reveals what can be growing in your gut, and it’s seriously gross

1 min read
Kendall Jenner

Ew. Just ew.

As you're probably well aware by the constant stream (literally, constant) of articles on the topic, recent studies have shown the direct influence gut health can have on mental health. In addition to the obvious symptoms of bloating, pain, and constipation, a bad gut can also exacerbate anxiety and depression. 

To put it simply, having a poor gut is not ideal. But, not to fear, there are things we can do to actively better it. Though, before we get to those, we wanted to find out how bad an unhealthy gut can get. No surprise there – very.

According to Debbie Dickson, Australia’s Director of Education at leading skin clinic DMK, western diets and lifestyle medications are to blame. 

"It's very common for people to have bad bacteria overloads and fungal overgrowth in the gut. We can also get parasites, like worms that are usually from ingesting the microscopic parasite eggs, and the most commons way we contract these is from water." 

Other common ways parasites can be contracted, Debbie says, are from overseas travel, pets, uncooked meat, and unwashed fruit and vegetables. Bottom line: it's extremely easy to contract a parasite.

To ensure your gut is at its best, Debbie suggests cutting down on sugar as it feeds the bad bacteria and fungal overload, along with any genetically modified foods such as gluten, soy, alcohol, and dairy. 

"The best diet is to eat as fresh and clean as possible, and to avoid pre-packaged foods." 

Fresh veggies, protein, fermented vegetables, sauerkraut, kombucha and apple cider vinegar are great to consume as they help to produce more stomach acid, essential for good gut health.

If you think you're suffering from any of the symptoms of an unhealthy gut, she also suggests trying Regul8 Digestive Tune-Up, a three-step program she developed that cleanses, soothes and repairs the gastrointestinal system. It works to eliminate unwanted organisms, repairs any existing irritations and, finally, maintains the rebalance of good bacterial cultures.  

Written By Sangeeta Kocharekar